Environment & Ecosystem Science (EES)

THE CONSTRUCTION SITE PROVIDES A SUITABLE ENVIRONMENT FOR VECTOR MOSQUITOES IN THE FEDERAL TERRITORY OF KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

June 20, 2022 Posted by AqilZ In Environment & Ecosystem Science (EES)

ABSTRACT

THE CONSTRUCTION SITE PROVIDES A SUITABLE ENVIRONMENT FOR VECTOR MOSQUITOES IN THE FEDERAL TERRITORY OF KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

Journal: Environment & Ecosystem Science (EES)

Author: Faizul Akmal Abdul Rahim, Mohd Amierul Fikri Mahmud, Mohd Farihan Md Yatim, Mohd Hatta Abdul Mutalip, Hanipah Shahar

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/ees.02.2022.58.63

Construction sites are often blamed for dengue outbreaks in surrounding localities. The environment is suitable for immature mosquitoes to develop without predators and the convenience of female mosquitoes to feed on the exposed construction workers. The purposes of this study were to identify the species of mosquitoes present at construction sites and the types of their preferred breeding habitats, and also to determine the vertical distribution of the mosquitoes. Nineteen construction sites in the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur were cross-sectionally surveyed for the presence of immature mosquitoes in 2018. All water-holding containers were inspected for the presence of immature mosquitoes. Types of water-holding containers were recorded and counted. The number of immature mosquitoes was counted from each positive container and then transferred to the laboratory for species identification. A total of 1,643 immature mosquitoes were collected, comprising 1,287 larvae and 356 pupae. Aedes aegypti immature was the most abundant mosquito species (76%), followed by Culex quinquefasciatus (19%), and the Aedes albopictus (5%). The most productive breeding sites were flooded floors, drains, plastic containers, elevator shafts, water drums, and pails. We discovered that the immature mosquitoes were most abundant from the ground floor to the second floor, with Ae. aegypti immature could disperse up to the thirteenth floor. This study has provided useful information to the health department regarding the preferred breeding habitats of vector mosquitoes at construction sites. Consequently, it contributes to effective and efficient vector prevention and control measures, thus saving time and manpower.

Pages 58-63
Year 2022
Issue 2
Volume 6

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