Environment & Ecosystem Science (EES)

DETECTION OF HBLD TOXIN GENE BY BACILLUS CEREUS ISOLATED FROM MEAT CURRY FOOD SAMPLES IN MALAYSIAN RESTAURANTS

June 9, 2020 Posted by din In Environment & Ecosystem Science (EES)

ABSTRACT

DETECTION OF HBLD TOXIN GENE BY BACILLUS CEREUS ISOLATED FROM MEAT CURRY FOOD SAMPLES IN MALAYSIAN RESTAURANTS

Journal: Environment & Ecosystem Science (EES)

Author: Marwan Msarah; Ahmed Alsier and Sahilah, A.M.

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License CC BY 4.0, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

DOI: 10.26480/ees.02.2020.68.72

Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous foodborne pathogen, can cause food poisoning, leading to infections, have two major types of food poisoning emetic and diarrheal. Foods rich in protein such as meat are associated with foodborne outbreaks of diarrhea caused by B. cereus. The aim of this study is to isolate and identify B. cereus from ready to eat (RTE) meat curry from restaurants in Malaysia and to detect hblD pathogenic gene of B. cereus isolates. Mannitol egg yolk polymyxin agar was used as a selective isolation medium. Commercially available kits and boiling methods were used for DNA extraction, samples acquired from restaurants were examined for the presence of Hemolysin BL gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among all isolates, twenty-four of B. cereus isolates detected for HBL enterotoxin production by the discontinuous pattern on HBL sheep blood agar then confirmed by biochemical tests. More than 58.33 % of the isolate showed discontinuous hemolysis pattern on HBl blood agar and 29.16% of the samples were shown positive for hblD gene that can cause diarrhea with the size of 807bp on gel. This study demonstrated that RTE meat curry was a potential source for entero-toxigenic B. cereus and the presence of the hblD toxin genes for the HBL complex in the isolates tested were highly associated. Therefore, these meat curry isolates should be regarded as potential toxin producers.

Pages 68-72
Year 2020
Issue 2
Volume 4

Download